Cities

You will find here Cities, Towns, & Villages along the byway.

Cities There are 4 products.

Subcategories

  • Oakland

    Valkommen (Welcome) to Oakland, 
    Swedish Capital of Nebraska!

    Located in Burt County in northeast Nebraska, Oakland is named after John Oak, who settled in this area in 1855 with 23 other pioneers. Mr. Oak then assisted five more Swedish families to settle in the Logan Creek Valley in 1866.The village was incorporated April 13, 1881, with 30 businesses, two banks and one printing office in operation.

    Oakland has a population of 1,279 and is still growing. Basic economic activities in the Oakland area include farming, cattle and hog production, feed processing, wholesale and retail sales, construction and medical services.

    The horse icon used as buttons on this page represents the Swedish Dala Horse. The craft of carving Dala Horses originated in Sweden in the Province of Dalarana in the early 18th century. After the wood cutters cut the trees for lumber, they would carve the leftover wood into toys for their children back in the villages. Carving also gave the wood cutters something to do during the long, cold Swedish winters. The horse was a popular choice for the carvings because they were regarded as a very special animal with traits of being hard working, sturdy and faithful.

    During the 19th century, it became custom to paint the wooden horses with brightly colored flower patterns. Soon the horses became known for their craftsmanship and were collected. Today the art of carving Dala Horses still exists in the Mora villages of Vattnäs, Risa, Bergkarlås and Nusnäs. The authentic decorating takes place in Nusnäs.

    Tack så mycket (Thank you) for choosing Oakland!
  • Bancroft

    Welcome to Bancroft... We’re a community of 500 people located in Cuming County in the northeastern corner of Nebraska. We are home to the John G. Neihardt Center and Sioux Prayer Garden attracting thousands of visitors to our town.  We have many businesses old and new and several projects to enhance our future--like construction of our new K-12 school and gymnasium, just to name one.  Come discover the quiet beauty of the Neihardt Center and a whole lot more.

  • Fort Calhoun

    Welcome to Fort Calhoun, Nebraska

    Located just eight miles from the Omaha metropolitan area, Fort Calhoun is nestled on the bluff overlooking the Missouri River valley in central Washington County in eastern Nebraska. Fort Calhoun offers small town living with the closeness of big town amenities.

    Fort Calhoun is rich in history and is home to the Lewis and Clark Council Bluff, the historic Frahm House and the Washington County Museum. Also in close proximity to Fort Calhoun are Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge, Fort Atkinson State Historical Park, and Desoto Bend National Wildlife Refuge. In addition, city parks, trails and views of the Missouri River Valley are abundant.

    Fort Calhoun has a diverse business base including Wilkinson Industries, Inc., OPPD Nuclear Power Station and Martin Marietta Materials Fort Calhoun Quarry. Fort Calhoun welcomes new businesses into the community and embraces their existing businesses. A new commercial subdivision sits directly on Highway 75 and is currently ready for occupancy. Families that are looking to move to Fort Calhoun can expect to find a mixture of new and established homes to choose from as well as acreage's that line the outskirts of our community.

    The Fort Calhoun Community School District is an independent district that provides quality education to K - !2 students as well as offering Pre-School (limited) and the Pioneer Learning Center. The district offers open enrollment options to students from across the Omaha metropolitan area. Many families from other areas of the metro choose to enroll their children in the Fort Calhoun Community School District because of their smaller class sizes and exceptional learning environment. 

    Fort Calhoun is small town living at its best! We invite you to come see what Fort Calhoun has to offer!

  • Decature

    Decatur...The second oldest settlement in Nebraska!

    Dating back to 1854, Decatur is proud to be the second oldest settlement in Nebraska. Incorporated in 1856, Decatur will celebrate 150 years in the Year 2006. The community lies at the foot of a high scenic bluff and next to the Missouri River along Highway 75, 60 miles north of Omaha, Neb., and 40 miles south of Sioux City, Iowa. The current population is 641.

    We would like to hear from you! Please send questions and comments to:

  • South Sioux City

    South Sioux City is a city in Dakota County, Nebraska, United States. It is located immediately across the Missouri River from Sioux City, Iowa, and is part of the Sioux City, IA-NE-SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 13,353, making it the 14th largest city in Nebraska.

    History

    Meriwether Lewis and William Clark passed through the South Sioux City area in 1804.[8]

    European settlement on the Nebraska side of the river began as early as 1854. Several town sites were platted and incorporated in the 1850s. Pacific City, incorporated in 1858, was a short-lived settlement.Covington and South Covington, both incorporated in 1857, merged in 1870. Another town, Stanton, was founded in 1856.

    South Sioux City was incorporated in 1887.[2] A special election in 1893 approved the merger of Covington and Stanton into the city of South Sioux City.[9]

    Geography

    South Sioux City is located at 42°28′16″N 96°24′53″W (42.471095, -96.414732).[10]

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.96 square miles (15.44 km2), of which, 5.71 square miles (14.79 km2) is land and 0.25 square miles (0.65 km2) is water.[4]

    In contrast to its hilly larger neighbor, South Sioux City is relatively flat. The difference in elevation across most of the city is less than 20 feet, generally ranging between 1,085 and 1,105 feet above sea level.[11]


    2010 census

    As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 13,353 people, 4,512 households, and 3,139 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,338.5 inhabitants per square mile (902.9/km2). There were 4,739 housing units at an average density of 829.9 per square mile (320.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 62.7% White, 4.7% African American, 3.0% Native American, 2.9% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 23.8% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 45.3% of the population.

    There were 4,512 households of which 42.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.4% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.51.

    The median age in the city was 30.5 years. 31.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.1% were from 25 to 44; 21.8% were from 45 to 64; and 10.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.6% male and 50.4% female.

    2000 census

    As of the census of 2000, there were 11,925 people, 4,304 households, and 2,961 families residing in the city. Of the 11,925 people, 48.6% are male and 51.4% are female. The population density was 2,431.6 people per square mile (939.6/km²). There were 4,557 housing units at an average density of 929.2 per square mile (359.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.9% White, 0.9% African American, 2.36% Native American, 3.19% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 14.57% from other races, and 3.05% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 24.8% of the population.

    There were 4,304 households out of which 38.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.26.

    In the city the population was spread out with 29.8% under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.

    The median income for a household in the city was $36,493, and the median income for a family was $42,712. Males had a median income of $27,259 versus $21,709 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,165. About 10.1% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.9% of those under age 18 and 8.3% of those age 65 or over.

    72.7% of the population held a high school diploma or higher; 12.7% held a bachelor's degree or higher; and 4.8% held a graduate or professional degree. 4.1% of the population were unemployed. Employed residents traveled an average of 15.3 minutes to their jobs.

    Arts and culture

    • The Annual Art Show is held in April and features artists from across the United States.[13]
    • Horse racing was held for 58 years at Atokad Downs.

    Infrastructure

    Highways

    Several highways serve South Sioux City:

    • Interstate 129 is a short east-west spur beginning at Interstate 29 in Sioux City. It enters South Sioux City via a bridge over the Missouri River, and crosses the southern end of South Sioux City with interchanges at Dakota Avenue (the city's main street) and U.S. Highway 77. Interstate 129 overlaps U.S. Highway 20 and U.S. Highway 75.
    Bridge on high concrete pillars; two pillars connected by double arch
    Siouxland Veterans Memorial Bridge
    • U.S. Highway 77 is a north-south highway whose northern terminus is at Interstate 29 in Sioux City. From there, it enters South Sioux City via the Siouxland Veterans Memorial Bridge, follows Dakota Avenue to 9th Street, then arcs west and south as a four-lane bypass around the city. In 1989, a large strip mall anchored by Wal-Mart and Hy-Vee opened along the bypass and effectively shifted the city's primary retail district from Dakota Avenue, in the center of town, to the western edge of the city.

    Public transit

    Local bus service to South Sioux City is provided by the Sioux City Transit System.

    Aviation

    The nearest commercial airport is Sioux Gateway Airport/Colonel Bud Day Field (SUX) in Sioux City. A smaller general-aviation airport, Martin Field (7K8), is located just west of South Sioux City along U.S. Highway 20

  • Blair

    Blair is a city in and the county seat of Washington County, Nebraska, United States.[5] The population was 7,990 at the 2010 census. Blair is a part of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Metropolitan Statistical Area.

    History

    Blair was platted in 1869 when the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad was extended to that point.[6] It was named for railroad magnate John Insley Blair, who was credited with bringing the railroad to town.[7] Within its first year, Blair was designated county seat.[6] Blair was incorporated as a city in 1872.[8]

    Geography

    Blair is located at 41°32′44″N 96°8′4″W (41.545562, -96.134383).[9] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.51 square miles (14.27 km2), of which, 5.49 square miles (14.22 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

    Blair has its own hospital, the Memorial Community Hospital, and being the county seat, also has a courthouse located in town.

    Municipal Cemetery


    2010 census

    As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 7,990 people, 3,110 households, and 2,005 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,455.4 inhabitants per square mile (561.9/km2). There were 3,351 housing units at an average density of 610.4 per square mile (235.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.4% White, 0.8% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.0% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.9% of the population.

    There were 3,110 households of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.5% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.01.

    The median age in the city was 36 years. 24.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.3% were from 45 to 64; and 15.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

    2000 census

    As of the census of 2000, there were 7,512 people, 2,871 households, and 1,891 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,617.3 people per square mile (625.1/km²). There were 3,033 housing units at an average density of 653.0 per square mile (252.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.43% White, 0.44% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.34% of the population.

    There were 2,871 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.8% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.1% were non-families. 29.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.02.

    In the city the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 13.8% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 90.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.

    As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $41,214, and the median income for a family was $52,114. Males had a median income of $36,839 versus $25,452 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,240. About 6.2% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

    Points of interest

    • Part of the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum collection
    • Blair was home to the now defunct Dana College
    • From 1896-1954, Blair was home to Trinity Seminary, a school of the United Evangelical Lutheran Church
    • Blair is located along the historic Lincoln Highway

    Notable people

    • Kent Bellows - artist
    • Bill Dannenhauser - professional wrestler
    • Mike Ekeler - assistant college football coach
    • Mike Hollingshead - photographer
    • Mick Mines - Nebraska state senator
    • Tom Seaton - baseball player
    • Paul Simon - Democratic Congressman, Senator, and presidential candidate
    • Rod Whitaker - novelist
  • Tekamah

    We are glad you are interested in our community and hope you will come visit us in person. In the mean time we hope you will browse through our web site and email us with any questions that you might have. 
    Come on in!


    Tekamah is located 40 miles north of Omaha on Hwy 75, South of Sioux City 60 miles on Hwy 75, and East of Norfolk 60 miles on Hwy 32. The Missouri River is just a few miles to the east and accessible at the Pelican Point State Park facility. The park offers a boat ramp and a picnic area.SS

  • Winnebago

    Winnebago (Hoocąk: Nįšoc [6]) is a village in Thurston County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 774 at the 2010 census.

    History

    The first post office at Winnebago was established in 1867.[7] It was named for the federally recognized Winnebago tribe,[8] whose name for themselves (autonym) is Ho-Chunk; they have a reservation in the county.

    Geography

    Winnebago is located at 42°14′14″N 96°28′18″W (42.237167, -96.471582).[9] It is located within the Winnebago Reservation of the Ho-Chunk.

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.20 square miles (0.52 km2), all of it land.[1]

    Demographics

    2010 census

    As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 774 people, 200 households, and 151 families residing in the village. The population density was 3,870.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,494.2/km2). There were 227 housing units at an average density of 1,135.0 per square mile (438.2/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 4.4% White, 0.1% African American, 90.6% Native American, 0.1% from other races, and 4.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.0% of the population.

    There were 200 households of which 62.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 24.0% were married couples living together, 36.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 15.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.5% were non-families. 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.84 and the average family size was 4.51.

    The median age in the village was 21.4 years. 43.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.4% were from 25 to 44; 17.8% were from 45 to 64; and 7.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

    2000 census

    As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 768 people, 211 households, and 166 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,704.4 people per square mile (1,059.0/km²). There were 233 housing units at an average density of 820.5 per square mile (321.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 5.47% White, 0.13% African American, 91.93% Native American, 1.95% from other races, and 0.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.73% of the population.

    There were 211 households out of which 50.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.8% were married couples living together, 38.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.9% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.58 and the average family size was 4.01.

    In the village the population was spread out with 42.7% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 14.1% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 23 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.9 males.

    As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $20,795, and the median income for a family was $21,818. Males had a median income of $18,958 versus $19,643 for females. The per capita income for the village was $6,317. About 43.7% of families and 48.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 55.6% of those under age 18 and 33.3% of those age 65 or over.

    Notable natives

    • John Raymond Rice (1914-1950) - Ho-Chunk casualty in the Korean War; US Army veteran.
    • Lillian St. Cyr (1884-1974) - Winnebago (Ho-Chunk) actress and star of the The Squaw Man (1914 film)
  • Dakota City

    Dakota City is a city in Dakota County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,919 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dakota County.[5] Tyson Foods' largest beef production plant is located in Dakota City.

    History

    Dakota City was platted in 1856.[6] It was named for the Dakota people.[7] Dakota City was incorporated as a city in 1858.[8]

    Geography

    Dakota City is located at 42°24′55″N 96°25′4″W (42.415294, -96.417808).[9]

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.20 square miles (3.11 km2), of which, 1.08 square miles (2.80 km2) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km2) is water.[1]


    2010 census

    As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,919 people, 637 households, and 464 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,776.9 inhabitants per square mile (686.1/km2). There were 657 housing units at an average density of 608.3 per square mile (234.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 82.4% White, 0.8% African American, 1.9% Native American, 4.5% Asian, 8.3% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 29.3% of the population.

    There were 637 households of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 27.2% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.37.

    The median age in the city was 34.6 years. 29.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.2% were from 45 to 64; and 9.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.1% male and 48.9% female.

    2000 census

    As of the census of 2000, there were 1,821 people, 596 households, and 448 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,728.7 people per square mile (669.6/km²). There were 627 housing units at an average density of 595.2 per square mile (230.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.62% White, 0.77% African American, 1.81% Native American, 1.92% Asian, 9.28% from other races, and 1.59% from two or more races.Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.21% of the population.

    There were 596 households out of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.7% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.38.

    In the city the population was spread out with 31.1% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 7.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 104.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.8 males.

    As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $43,438, and the median income for a family was $45,987. Males had a median income of $30,612 versus $24,150 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,923. About 7.0% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.

    Notable people

    Emmanuel Lutheran Church was the first Lutheran church constructed in Nebraska. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
    • Ralph F. Beermann - Member of the United States House of Representatives from Nebraska
    • James Young Deer - Silent-era American Indian director and actor.
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 items
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 items